uplyme.com Forum Index uplyme.com
The Uplyme Debate
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Butterflies and Moths of the Parish of Uplyme

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    uplyme.com Forum Index -> Wildlife and the Environment
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 09/04/07, 06:14    Post subject: Butterflies and Moths of the Parish of Uplyme Reply with quote

I am posting this message on behalf of Alan Kennard and Chris Paul, as neither of them use the internet.

They are particularly interested in the species of moths and butterflies found within the Parish of Uplyme. As most of the 2,700 plus species of moths are night flying and the identification of many of them is quite difficult it is very much a field for the specialist. On the other hand butterflies, with just 58 species, all day flying are much easier for the less expert. Alan and Chris would very much like to seek your assistance in recording Uplyme’s butterflies this year.

Please send your records of butterflies to me, via a PM or alternatively post a follow up message on the forum, include the date especially that on which you first saw the species in 2007, and include the precise location. If you are not sure of the identification then please add a description and if possible a picture. There is much help in identification on the net. A good site dealing especially with the commoner species is:
http://www.butterflygarden.co.uk
Whilst all the British species are dealt with on:
http://www.ukbutterflies.co.uk/identification.php
There are many excellent pictures on this site and helpful distribution maps to see if the species is likely to be found in our area.

I plan shortly to put up a website in connection with this project and will notify the forum when it is up and running. To be included will be the records that you submit and also a list of butterflies seen by Alan and Chris in the parish during 2006. In the meantime you will find below the butterfly year so far in Uplyme.


The Butterflies of Uplyme Parish in 2007

With Spring now upon us we will begin to see more butterflies. If any person would like to log their first sighting of a particular butterfly the correspondents would be pleased to have this information.

So far this year the hibernators have been active when it has been warmer than usual. These include:

    Red Admiral – active in February
    Peacock - 16th March
    Small Tortoiseshell
    Comma-24th March
    Brimstone – 10th March
    Small White – 30th March

Have you any earlier dates?
Please add also first sightings of other butterflies

April: We should expect:
    Orange Tip – first on 5thApril and several since.
    Speckled Wood
    Green-veined White
    Holly Blue

A Clouded Yellow was reported from Ware Cliff in the third week of March. Was it a hibernator or a migrant?

Updated 8th April 2007

_________________
It's later than you think


Last edited by Rhodie on 09/03/08, 21:39; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 03/07/07, 05:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is an update on the butterflies and moths of the parish from Alan Kennard

Butterfly Update – June 30th 2007

The Green Hairstreak has been confirmed as being in the Parish (Trinity Hill nature reserve)

For July keep an eye open for Wood White along the Undercliff. The second generation should be out in the second half of the month. Also around the parish the second generation of Holly Blue, Comma, Small Tortoiseshell and Peacock. In the hedgerows Gatekeeper and Ringlet and later in the month Silver–washed Fritillary. On short cropped grassland Small Heath. Keep an eye open for the fast flying Dark Green Fritillary again where there is rough grassland (habitat of the Marbled White) and where violets grow.

No noticeable influx of butterfly migrants so far. A few Red Admirals (some may be resident: some recent arrivals)

Of the day flying moths a Humming-bird Hawkmoth was seen on 26th June.

_________________
It's later than you think
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 28/08/07, 07:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is the latest news on the butterflies and moths of the parish from Alan Kennard

Butterfly Update – August 24th 2007

What has happened to our butterflies (and moths too for that matter) this summer?
After such spring promise what a summer! so far. Some of our common butterflies – although present – have been in short supply. So what about September and the autumn.

Well look out for Red Admirals (a few are about): Painted Lady (hardly any seen so far, but locally raised examples just appearing) and Clouded Yellow (just four this summer and none in Uplyme parish).

Others will include Small Copper, Common Blue. Brimstone and of course the Small Tortoiseshell and Comma as well as the Speckled Wood. Rotting fruit in the orchard will attract plenty of Red Admirals.

Of day flying moths there have been just a few Humming-bird Hawkmoths and the Jersey tiger is about as I write.

Keep an eye open for a large hoverfly – Volucella zonaria – quite a spectacular beast – looks like a hornet at first sight but it is harmless and a bit smaller. It’s more than twice the size of any other hoverfly. It was once very rare but is now being seen more frequently. I have seen two in the parish recently feeding on Hemp Agrimony, Buddleia, and other nectar producing flower.

And in the evening the ticking sound in the hedgerow is the Dark Bush Cricket.

Now this topsy - turvy year. We may be paying the price for the very hot dry spring. For some insects it has done them no good. On the moth front the numbers of common species is a fraction of those recorded last year. Add to this the confusion caused by high spring temperatures as if summer has already arrived and we may notice a poor showing next year as numbers for the next generation may be low.

_________________
It's later than you think
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 09/03/08, 21:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Butterflies in Uplyme Parish – 2007

2007 started very well for butterflies with the mild winter and warm spring. A colleague saw a red admiral in January and the species has been recorded within the Parish every month in 2007. The last was seen on December 9th. It is almost certain that it over-wintered successfully in the parish this year as, we suspect, did the clouded yellow. Other species were recorded much earlier than usual as a result of the warm spring. However after an excellent start the weather was poor in late spring and early summer, limiting the butterflies seen. Hence there were some absences or low numbers this year. We were able to confirm the presence of the green hairstreak on Trinity Hill. Otherwise it was an average to slightly disappointing year, largely due to the wet weather.


Small skipper Seen just once on Trinity Hill in July.
Large skipper seen more commonly; first seen 5th June 2007, compared with 6th July in 2006.
Dingy skipper Not seen within the Parish in 2007, but present at Ware Cliffs, Dorset on April 16th.
Wood white Not seen within the Parish in 2007, but present at Ware Cliffs, Dorset on April 16th.
Clouded yellow Seen in several locations along the East Devon and West Dorset coasts very early in the year , but the second generation was disappointing.
Brimstone Again seen very early (first record 6th March) after hibernation, but the July emergence was disappointing.
Large (cabbage) white A moderately good year. Our populations are strengthened each year by immigration. First seen April 14th .
Small white. Similar to the previous species.
Green-veined white First seen 28th March, a little earlier than the previous year, but the species had a reasonable good year.
Orange tip First seen 5th April, a little earlier than last year and a much better year than 2006. The flight period was almost over before the weather turned.
Green hairstreak Confirmed on Trinity Hill this year after unsuccessful searches in 2005 and 2006. The habitat looks ideal and it is surprising it is not more common.
Small copper First seen on 3rd May 2007 compared with 18th July 2006, but overall a poor year, especially after the strong showing in autumn 2006.
Brown argus Not recorded in 2007, but seen once on Park Farm just outside the parish.
Common blue A poor year. Only five records within the parish.
Chalk-hill blue Not seen in 2007, so its presence in the parish still needs confirmation.
Holly blue A better than average year for both spring and summer generations.
Red admiral 2007 was the year of the red admiral. It was seen within the parish every month in 2007.
Painted lady Not a good year. A migrant from southern Europe and North Africa. First seen 10th June and last recorded on November 4th, but very few sightings in between.
Small tortoiseshell First seen on 26th March. Not a particularly good year and certainly not as common as in past years. This species may be a ‘trough’. Is our countryside too tidy? Not enough nettles in sunny places?
Peacock First seen 14th Feb 2007 compared with 5th April 2006. Still doing better than the small tortoiseshell after a couple of poor years in 2004 and 2005.
Comma A good year. First seen on 8th March 2007 compared with 8th April in 2006
Silver-washed fritillary Still around in the parish, but a victim of the poor weather during its flight period – first seen 18th July.
Speckled wood First seen on 6th April 2007, compared with 4th May 2006. This species may be going through a bad patch, but it had a better year than in 2006 – last sighting 6th November.
Wall Not seen in the parish in 2007, but seen on Ware Cliffs, Dorset on April 16th.
Marbled white Seen in the unimproved, flower-rich meadow at Rocombe, but another victim of the poor weather during its flight period (late June to early August)
Gatekeeper One of our commonest butterflies, seen in hedges in July and August. It emerged 1 day earlier than last year, but numbers were down after a steady increase over the previous four years.
Meadow brown Possibly our commonest and most widespread butterfly. First seen on 4th June and around until 8th September. Even so it was affected by the poor summer.
Ringlet Another butterfly affected by the poor summer, but numbers were well up in one garden.
Small heath Not seen by the authors in 2007, despite searching the locality at Cathole Farm two or three times in spring.

Of the species recorded regularly in one garden, the following had a good year compared to the average for the
five years 2003-2007: holly blue, ringlet, peacock and orange tip. The brimstone, red admiral, green-veined white,
silver-washed fritillary, large white, small copper and small white had a good year but were only slightly up on the
average records, The gatekeeper, comma, speckled wood, meadow brown, small tortoiseshell and common blue
were slightly down on the average, whereas the painted lady, clouded yellow, marbled white and large skipper were
significantly down on the average and had a poor year.

Alan Kennard, Chris Paul
_________________
It's later than you think
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 09/03/08, 21:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moths in Uplyme Parish – 2007

2007 was not a particularly good year for moths, numbers of even the common species being dramatically down on 2005 and 2006. There are probably many reasons for this but high on the list is the overall weather pattern with a predominance of north westerly air streams through the summer and autumn. This affected the mobility of moths which may not have moved too far from their breeding locations. However, to put it into perspective, 2005 and 2006 were exceptional years.

Nevertheless, some interesting observations were recorded with eight species being added to the parish list of in excess of 400 Macro-moths. All but one of these eight are resident species. More interesting were the species not encountered and surmising why.

Day Flying Moths

Humming-bird Hawkmoth A few but not a very good year, First seen 26th June.
Jersey Tiger Again not a particularly good year.
Scarlet Tiger Not seen. This moth has a courtship ritual which, when witnessed (a warm evening in July) is fascinating.

Migrant Moths

A poor year generally for both regular and occasional visitors.

Silver Y Relatively few, despite being about in January
“noctuella” Just three seem – a complete contrast to 2006.

And for the exceptionals

Dusky Hook-tip
Probably the first record for Devon (not noted from Dorset either)
“Blue” Underwing The third in the past four years, not previously recorded in Devon since 1895
Clancy’s Rustic Added to the British List in 2003, now probably temporarily resident in the parish.

Resident Moths

Populations wax and wane from one year to another and one decade to another. Amongst those declining nationally at the present are Dusky Thorn, Rosy Footman, Sallow Moth and Flounced Rustic but fortunately our populations seem to be holding up though fewer of the latter species were seen in the autumn of 2007.

Characteristic of 2007 was the absence of some species whose habitats are distinctly coastal, The probable explanation lies in the prevailing winds and lack of mobility on account of colder nights, The parish holds a strong colony (or colonies) of the pyralid moth, Evergestis pallidator which is scarce in the south-west.

Other Insects

Hoverflies

A fascinating and manageable group of insects to study. Two of our largest hoverflies were seen in the parish, both scarce insects.

Volucella zonaria At first sight could be mistaken for a hornet but in fact is two thirds of the size seen feeding on Buddleia and Scabious on 3rd and 23rd August and again, this time on Hemp Agrimony, on 21st August.
Heliophilus trivittatus On Hemp Agrimony, near Middle Mill, on 2nd September.

Incidentally Hornets are seen regularly.

Alan Kennard, Chris Paul
_________________
It's later than you think
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 09/03/08, 22:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

2008
Butterflies to look out for in March


As the days warm up those butterflies that hibernate will take to the wing on sunny days. Look out for the yellow Brimstone and also for the Comma - distinguished by its jagged wings and comma mark on the underside.

Red Admirals, Peacocks and Small Tortoiseshells will also be out (as they were in mid February’s warm spell)

Is it going to be an early spring as in 2007? We have to wait and see.

STOP PRESS

The Brown Hairstreak butterfly has been added to the Uplyme list by Chris Paul. This secretive butterfly is not often seen as an adult. More easily as an egg on blackthorn twigs in winter.

Our current practice of flailing our hedges in winter is doing no favours for this butterfly. Good management practice is to leave some blackthorn hedges and rotate the cutting over a two or three year cycle. This will give the butterfly (and other species) a chance.

Alan Kennard
_________________
It's later than you think
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    uplyme.com Forum Index -> Wildlife and the Environment All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group