uplyme.com Forum Index uplyme.com
The Uplyme Debate
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

So why are we in Afghanistan ?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    uplyme.com Forum Index -> Beyond the Boundary
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 20/07/10, 09:42    Post subject: So why are we in Afghanistan ? Reply with quote

We are paying the highest price possible for our war in Afghanistan.

No, not just the 3 billion pounds which we can ill-afford, but the blood of our excellent young soldiers, marines and airmen who go where they are sent and do what they are asked to the very best of their ability. Yes, of course they know the risks when they join up - it's that sort of job, exciting but quite possibly lethal. But if, as a nation, we are prepared to continue to pay this price, we should understand very clearly what we are buying. I for one, do not.

The government says we are fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan 'to make our streets safer' - can anyone explain just how that works please ?

Deranged religeous bigots who want to make bombs and kill innocent passers-by do not need a distant country riddled with Taliban insurgents. They don't need a lab and a team of experts to mix a few fairly common chemicals together. They just need the Internet, someone fairly good with wire and batteries and a shed. They don't need several weeks of field combat training with RPGs and heavy machine guns to walk into a crowded area and press a button - yes in these sad days of suicide bombers they don't even need a timer.

So in what way are we making our streets safer by sticking our noses in other country's business and making enemies of them? I don't get it. How does it make us safer ?

Or, does it all really come down to that old three letter word O-I-L ? There isn't much in the way of natural reserves that we know of under that region, but it would make a convenient route for gas/oil pipelines to the west from central asian republics like Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan.

Energy is expensive these days isn't it ?

G.


_________________
it's never too late


Last edited by geoff on 27/07/10, 08:29; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Driver



Joined: 24 Aug 2008

Posts: 106
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 21/07/10, 07:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may be close to the truth here! The only reason the USA got involved in Kuwait was that Saddam wanted to start selling oil in Euros not Dollars, the Saudi's didn't care who sorted it out as long as the royal family stayed in power in Saudi Arabia and they could say wasn't us it was the (insert suitable none Muslim name).

There never was any real threat to KSA by Saddam only the oil production, and remember we (the UK) turn down the mineral rights to KSA in 1938 we told King Saud that it wasn't worth £500,000 and a waste of time!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
voluntaryist.uk



Joined: 23 Mar 2010

Posts: 74
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 04/02/11, 08:30    Post subject: Global Oil Production Update & EIA Data Changes Reply with quote

(courtesy of: www.gregor.us) January 14, 2011
For oil production data-heads the EIA’s decision to terminate the International Petroleum Monthly has produced a small tremor. Yes, the data supposedly will be available each month through one of EIA’s databrowsers. However, these embedded browsers are actually not as user-friendly as the EIA might assume. For chart-makers like myself, we need Excel files. And many of us hope (and assume) there will be an extractable Excel file for global crude oil production data once the transition is made. For now, EIA has just produced its last IPM (December 2010) which updates data through October of 2010. Let’s take a look at the most recent revisions, and latest production levels. | see: Global Crude Oil Production in mbpd 2002-2010.

A new post-crisis global oil production high was reached in October, at 74.08 mbpd (million barrels per day). It should be cautioned however that downward revisions every month this year have taken away previous monthly peaks, and we will have to wait until next year to see how 2010 settles out. Volatility in both production (and data gathering) in regions from Canada to the North Sea have produced wild swings this year. Meanwhile, Non-OPEC supply is getting another boost from Russia, even as the rest of Non-OPEC languishes.
I wrote about some of the broader issues relating to EIA’s handling of data this week in an expanded post for The Oil Drum. | see: Secrecy By Complexity: Obfuscation in Energy Data, and The Primacy of Crude Oil. One of the pleasures of doing a guest post at “TOD” is the number of smart comments that populate the chatboard. The Oil Drum maintains a very high signal-to-noise ratio in the comment stream, which means most of the remarks helpfully amplify or educate others on the subject at hand. Unsurprisingly, the fundamental problem created by the EIA’s inclusion of biofuels and natural gas liquids in their forecasts for future oil supply was well understood, and well known at TOD.
With the recent data now in for October 2010, let’s also update the average annual crude oil production chart. | see: Global Average Annual Crude Oil Production mbpd 2001 – 2010.


Global crude oil production in 2010 has been benefiting from two factors. One, the financial collapse and reduced global oil demand of 2008-2009 reduced pressure on supply, and allowed for projects to come on stream. Second, 2010 average oil prices were the second highest ever, at $79.48 per barrel. That particular price is just high enough for the world to fight decline, from existing fields. However, as you can see in the chart, with only two more months of data yet to come through on 2010 it’s a near certainty that–for a fifth year in a row–global oil production will come in below the peak year of 2005. [/img]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
voluntaryist.uk



Joined: 23 Mar 2010

Posts: 74
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 04/02/11, 08:33    Post subject: Will this be the "last" oil shock? Reply with quote

please read the following, this is it folks, this is potentially the single most damaging event that will happen yet, everything else could domino from this event. If you are not prepared now, you only have a very, very short time to do so. from: http://www.businessinsider.com/120-o...ess+Insider%29

According to Merrill Lynch’s Sabine Schels, a commodity analyst, the breaking point for the global economy is when the size of the energy sector hits 9%. With the sector currently at 7.8% Schels says the breaking point is $120 oil: “Whenever the size of the energy sector in the global economy reached 9 percent, we went into a major crisis,” said Sabine Schels, a commodity analyst at Merrill Lynch.”It was in the 1980s and it was the same in 2008. Right now we are at about 7.8 percent and if you go above $100 per barrel to $120 per barrel, you get to that 9 percent level.”

With oil trading at roughly $92 today this leaves us with a 30% cushion according to this analysis, however, strains will increase if prices should continue to gravitate towards that level. The IEA’s Chief Economist, Fatih Birol says the issue is already increasingly similar to 2008: “The ratio of countries’ oil import bills to GDP, a key measure of the cost of oil prices on economies, is close to levels last seen during the financial crisis in 2008, Mr Birol warned.If oil prices remain above $90/barrel for the rest of this year then the ratio for the European Union will be 2.1 per cent – close to the 2.2 per cent level it reached in 2008.”

Either way, with oil prices very strong before the seasonally strong summer season there is a good chance that higher oil and gas prices will continue to pose a very serious risk to the global economy. Ironically, a booming global economy might just be the fuel for oil and gas prices that tip the global economy back into malaise. Will surging inflation in the emerging markets expose the underlying deflationary risks that persist in the developed world?

Prep, Prep, Prep! tell your family, tell your friends, get ready.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 04/02/11, 08:53    Post subject: Re: Will this be the "last" oil shock? Reply with quote

voluntaryist.uk wrote:
please read the following, this is it folks, this is potentially the single most damaging event that will happen yet...

Prep, Prep, Prep! tell your family, tell your friends, get ready.


Thanks for the warning, but what apocalyptic event are we to prepare for when the energy sector in the global economy reaches 9 percent and how should we prepare for it ?

Also, just for the record, the financial problems in 2008 and the 1980s was caused by disastrous banking decisions, not energy costs (see http://www.gao.gov/archive/1997/gg97096.pdf)

G.
_________________
it's never too late
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
voluntaryist.uk



Joined: 23 Mar 2010

Posts: 74
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 04/02/11, 09:43    Post subject: RE: what apocalyptic event Reply with quote

well when the oil runs out (and it will) ie becomes unaffordable then we are into: TEOTWAWKI or The End of the world as we know it.

read: http://collapsenet.com/
http://www.peakoil.net/
http://www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net/
http://gas2.org/2010/06/04/societal-collapse-due-to-peak-oil-inevitable-according-to-researcher/
http://www.dynamiclist.com/?worldview/collapse

watch:
http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=video&cd=3&ved=0CEUQtwIwAg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DIESYMFtLIis&rct=j&q=collapse&ei=DclLTdiyGYywhQfz1tSPDw&usg=AFQjCNEZ45rs-ANkiMe-P5Fj5ZcFhK0PwA&cad=rja
http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/50078/Collapse__part_1_/
http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/50113/Collapse__part_2_/

to survive after that watch the end of the 2nd part of the collapse film.

PEACE & prepare
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 04/02/11, 10:27    Post subject: Re: RE: what apocalyptic event Reply with quote

voluntaryist.uk wrote:
well when the oil runs out (and it will) ie becomes unaffordable then we are into: TEOTWAWKI or The End of the world as we know it.


Your first link is to the website of Michael C. Ruppert, a well established conspiricy theorist, trying to sell more books. The second is an organisation that predicted global peak oil usage would be in 1997 and has regularly amended this ever since - the peak not having been reached even now. Unfortunately, I don't really have time to go through the rest, but with respect, I think you set your threshold of believability somewhat low. As I paraphrased elsewhere, "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence".

Oil is traded on open markets, so it's price will ebb and flow according to demand. Blips aside, if demand exceeds supply the price will rise and vice versa. If we consider vehicle fuel (probably the most familiar form of energy regularly bought by the average person), from an ecological standpoint, petrol and diesel is far too cheap and the price paid at the pumps does not reflect the true cost to the planet.

Lastly, a huge part of the street price of vehicle fuel is down to taxation (Fuel Excise Duty plus VAT) and oil company profits. Work it out for yourself - a $90 barrel of crude oil contains about 160 litres, which after refining produces around 75 litres of petrol to be sold, so the base cost of the product is very roughly 74p/litre.

G.
_________________
it's never too late
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
voluntaryist.uk



Joined: 23 Mar 2010

Posts: 74
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 11/02/11, 11:05    Post subject: don't say I did'nt warn you Reply with quote

don't say I did'nt warn you
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
voluntaryist.uk



Joined: 23 Mar 2010

Posts: 74
Location: Uplyme

PostPosted: 11/02/11, 12:22    Post subject: re; mike ruppert, etc Reply with quote

Mike a much respected former LAPD Detective & researcher does no deal with conspiracy theories he deals with conspiracy fact, to quote him,
See mike confront the Head of the CIA re: the CIA running drug in LA:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4t3pl5Wxgyg
read his report to the President of the USA no less:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/48633603/presidential-energy-policy-25-points-addressing-energy-money-ruppert-2009-
Presentation on American Hegemony:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I65v_B5trGs&feature=related
a presentation on the book written by: ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI
THE GRAND CHESSBOARD (American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives)
http://www.hollings.org/Content/Zbigniew.Brzezinski_Grand.Chess.Board.pdf
and as for peak oil:
http://transitionvoice.com/2010/11/its-official-peak-oil-came-in-2006/

Don't let the mainstream be your only source, do your own research, do not take my word for it, Peak oil is here, hence the reason we are in Afghanistan, Iraq, & elsewhere (as well as the USA) check out this map that list major NATO bases, right beside the major pipelines in afghanistan, Ieaq, Saudi Arabia, etc.
http://voluntary-exchanges-only.blogspot.com/p/maps.html

Now tell me why you think we are over there?

over to you....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 11/02/11, 12:27    Post subject: Re: So why are we in Afghanistan ? Reply with quote

Well, I don't think I have changed my mind since my original posting...
geoff wrote:
that old three letter word O-I-L
Energy is expensive these days isn't it ?


G.
_________________
it's never too late
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    uplyme.com Forum Index -> Beyond the Boundary All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group